Criminals, Murderers and Rapists in Indian Politics – 11 Jan 11

Politics

There is something about Indian politics that strikes everybody who has a closer look at the biographies of politicians ruling the different states, regions and even of those sitting in parliament. You will find a lot of crimes in their curriculum vitae. According to Indian law, a politician can be elected, even if there are criminal charges pending against him. He can be elected as long as he is not being found guilty. So even if a politician sits in prison, in police custody while he is waiting for trial or his trial is going on, he or she can be elected.

History can tell how many people who had murdered, killed and robbed and who had spent years and years in prison became members of parliament. Big mafia bosses, who are presently in jail, are planning already for the next election and asking parties for a ticket to be a candidate.

Here are some statistics of one of our neighbouring states, Bihar: in the elections 2005, there were 358 candidates who had criminal cases pending against them. They came from all parties. Out of these 358 candidates, 213 had cases like murder, attempt to murder, kidnapping, robbery, extortion or similar pending against them.

The election commission of India were worrying about these serious cases such as murder and rape and asked the government to stop the participation in election of people accused of such crimes. They should be banned from elections completely and not receive a seat for any party. It is obvious why: Indian politics become more and more criminal, the more criminals are sitting in our parliaments and councils. It is not good for democracy, not good for the trust of people in our government and not good for the country. Funnily enough a person sitting in prison does not have the right to vote but he has the right to be elected as long as he was not found guilty. Being elected won’t get him out of prison either but there will be enough people who bring him papers to sign while he is there. The system of law enforcement however, with too many pending cases and only few judges, can lead to such a prolonging of a case that a criminal is not found guilty for many years.

Now imagine, you are going to vote for your state’s or country’s election and you know which party you usually sympathize with. But you see that their candidate is a murderer! Okay, reluctantly you turn to the next party and you see their candidate is a known rapist! Well, all you can do in this situation is to choose the lesser evil and maybe vote for a robber or thief.

What can you expect from such politicians? We have a democracy but the public chooses the criminals and sends them to parliament! Of course the biggest responsibility lies with the parties who make them candidates but the public has to take their responsibility, too. And there, again, lack of education is a big problem. Some people don’t know about the people whom they vote for. Other times, those criminals force whole villages to vote for them or simply fill everybody’s election papers themselves and nobody gets to see one. Is it really such a wonder that corruption is a big problem in our country?

For more information on criminals in politics: http://www.adrindia.org/

(27)

  1. Manoj Kargudri

    It was very nice reading this article. The Foremost duty and responsibility of a leader is to serve the mankind. It 19s to be constructive. Anger, hatred and frustrations are destructive, which is not good to prosper. It has to be replaced with brotherhood, compassion and love in order to achieve the noble cause of mankind. It 19s to serve and achieve the good purpose without any personal greedy desire to dictate and rule forcibly. It 19s to confess, seek and pray for good things in life. It 19s to be calm, gentle, humble and thus be stable. The objective to fulfill the necessity and requirement of the generations is to be achieved at any cost. They have to sacrifice the false ego of superiority. It has to be replaced with brotherhood, compassion and love in order to achieve the noble cause of mankind. It is not saying something and doing something else, but it is saying the right thing and doing exactly what we say. Law and order is to protect the innocent and poor. Law and order must not be used to create fear and terror but to provide freedom and liberty to masses and generations, for the protection of the needy and poor people. Law and order has to be reformed to better safe standards. Innocent people are hurt When Law and Order is not well reformed and implemented in reality. Innocent poor people who are helpless are the direct victims.
    Relative Link:
    http://sam131141510thebittertruth.blogspot.com/2007/12/duty-responsibility-law-and-order.html

  2. Liz from Washington

    Oh my gosh. This is crazy.

  3. Howard Duddly

    It can be dangerous to band people who have been accused of crimes from running for government office. Think of how corrupt such a law could become, accusing good and honest leaders with positive agendas of various crimes just to keep them out of office. Court cases take years and this has its disadvantages but these kinds of proceedings are in place to protect the people. My question is why there aren’t more good men and women running for office. What are the foundational causes of this? And how can it be changed?

  4. Eliza Branch from Goergia

    I can’t believe this situation. Thank you for informing your readers Swami Ji.

  5. Nick Nolty

    No law can determine outcomes. The people will make their own way. And there are too many good people in India for this not to change. It needs to change.

  6. Joseph

    Can’t believe it. This is insane!

  7. Armin

    I had been already aware of this situation, but it is still unbelivable. And I wasn`t aware how many cases it concerns.From my point of view those who make policy just in relation of there own win and ignoring what harm there decisions cause for the people are also criminals.
    I`m still hoping there will be a change, and we all will one day be governed by polticians acting out of good will and not greed.

    Love

    Armin

  8. PoliticsBlog

    firstly thrilled to find this site and as for the post, I think there is a reason they allow indicted politicos to still be mps or parliamentarians or whatever and that reason is of course of colonial past. The gandhi’s and bhagatsingh’s of that time did go to jail and it was understood that they have been framed, wrongly accused or accused of things which aren’t a crime at all (like desiring indpendence) but sadly, even though we aren’t a british colony now, we still follow the same mindset. Truly sad it is…

  9. anonymous

    But what if the only way to get decent people running for office is to ban the people with pending criminal charges. What if there won’t be another decent option otherwise? What do you do?

  10. Carie Jones

    Good website. Thanks Swami Ji.

  11. Hermione

    That is an excellent point. Why aren’t there more good people running for office? What exactly do you have to do to succeed in India politics? is abusing power and taking advantage of people the only way?

  12. Amy Mcfarlane

    It will change, if the people change it.

  13. Nancy H.

    I’ve heard a lot of discouraged voices when it comes to positive change in India and in the U.S.My friend used to tell me that she was disgusted by the American meat industry but becoming a vegetarian wouldn’t do anything. There weren’t enough people making the switch to make a difference. Five years later, even Walmart has started to sell vegetarian products (meat supplements).
    What would have happened if Gandhi had said, I am too few to be heard so I won’t speak?
    Thanks Swami Ji. I think that this is really important information your offering.

  14. Kim from Norwich, England

    When I was in Africa there was the same attitude towards throwing rubbish in the rivers and streets, even among the educated. That is one of the major reasons everything is so polluted there.

  15. Fez from Canada

    I’m currently traveling in India. I over heard a man having a conversation about corruption in government politics. He said something that stuck with me: “It is not about complaining. It is about doing what you can.” The patience and acceptance behind his words really struck me.

  16. Sharon Chin

    This sounds like a disaster. I really don’t know what else to say. It feels really overwhelming.

  17. Neil from Alabama

    How do candidates get away with filling out other people’s election ballets. That is just so nuts. What is to stop the media from covering such a story? Are these criminals not afraid of exposure?

  18. Johny Walker

    I was really mad at some police men I met in India and really surprised that they didn’t care how many times I called them thieves in front of a crowd. They reprimanded me rightly for smoking on a train. But of course they wanted a great deal more money than the actual fine and they wouldn’t give me a reciet. I argued with them, through their threats. People kept telling me to sit down and go back to my seat and I understand why but nothing changes that way. When I was in Goa, I even read about cops threatening to plant drugs on tourists if they don’t pay bribes. I have seen police that are much worse in other countries and I have seen police that are better in others and many of the police I have met in India have been really wonderful people. But I think this really must not be yielded to if anyone wishes for it to be different.

  19. Epo (Hawaii)

    I’ve put my safety in serious jeopardy before through these kinds of skirmishes. And I’ve been in situations where the police are so powerful and careless that they could get away with anything and you give in or you get hurt. I don’t know. How you fight really matters, and I don’t think that fighting through anger or a sense of injustice is always hurtful but it doesn’t seem to change things the way we expect it to. I think that history indicates that the most profound social change has come from very peaceful, very wise, and very patient voices….From people who can love a criminal. That is my take.

  20. Al Scotton

    Can politicians actually serve from prison? Once they have been elected?

  21. Chelsea Thomas

    This is great news. The article says that “.. the state government is taking action in only those cases where there is a lot of public pressure to act.” If this is the truth, as sad as it may be, it means that it is time to crank up the pressure on criminal politicians.

  22. parekh

    Let the sleeping dogs lie !
    I think it was Oliver Cromwell who said these famous words – may be in a different context , at a different time , in a different country
    But right now , in our beloved India , our very own ( not so beloved ? ) political leaders seem to be telling the Supreme Court , the same thing !
    Yesterday , Supreme Court dismissed a Central Government appeal to review its earlier ruling , which held ;
    “ An elected representative stands disqualified from the date of his conviction in a criminal offence . The mere fact that the convicted politician has appealed against his conviction does not imply that he would continue to hold office “
    So , what will the Government do now ?
    With solid , unanimous backing from ALL political parties , it will amend the Representation of People Act , to nullify the Court verdict !
    Of Course , retrospectively from 15 Aug 1947 !
    I am not surprised , given the following statistics compiled by Association for Democratic Reforms :—-

    ————————————————————————————-

    Party ……………% age of MPs/MLAs with criminal charges

    —————————————————————-

    BJP………………………. 31
    Congress…………….. 22
    NCP……………………….30
    Shiv Sena……………. 75
    RJD…………………………46
    JD(U)………………….. 44
    SP………………………. 43
    Rest …………………….. 32-36

    ————————————————————————————-
    Not having voted for past 30 years , I have a satisfaction of not having chosen myself , which party will torment / torture / murder me for next 5 years !
    But of course , I will vote when I am allowed to cast “ Negative Votes “ !
    When will India’s youth rise in revolt ?

    • hemen parekh

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